• France Issues 11 Licenses For Online Gambling

    09 June 2010

    Newspaper

    France acknowledged that 11 companies have been granted license and have been registered to conduct online sports and horse race betting as well as online poker within France.

    According to Arjel president Jean-Francois Vilotte, the regulator of gaming in France,

    “There were 35 requests for licenses and we have retained 17 at this stage. None have been formally rejected.”

    The companies include state run Francaise des Jeux, Pari Muteul Urbain (horse racing), Iliad Gaming, Sajoo, Betclic, Beturf, BES SS, Everest Gaming, France Pari, SPS Betting France and Table 14.

    There have been critics of France’s move into online gambling as well and the online poker side of the new law has been delayed due to a complaint from Malta.

    See more about France’s new online gambling bill.

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